CapeMay.com Blog

Category: Environmental & Nature

27th Annual Hawk Watch

Some sit patiently waiting. Some stand — their bodies pivot, arms upraised, binoculars in hand. They speak in quiet tones like people waiting for a golfer to hit a crucial shot. It’s easy to tell the serious hawk watchers from the everyday tourist or curious spectator. For one, they have equipment.

Desalination: Cape May Leads the Northeastern U.S.

“Water, water, everywhere —nor any drop to drink…”* Cape May’s Desalination Plant’s no Albatross! *Apologies to Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his legendary poem “Ryme of the Ancient Mariner” There can be no debate, water is the sustenance of life. As the world’s population and demands increase, natural resources deplete. Today’s worldwide water crisis has forced… Read more »

For the love of the game

The sport of fishing is one that includes both luck and talent. Fate plays a big hand, as does Mother Nature. Being in the right place at the right time and knowing how to hook the “big one” – well, that’s what it’s all about. As the daughter of a sport fisherman, I watched from… Read more »

Living on the Bird Way

“Pisscchhh! pssch, pssch, pssch.” It woke me very early one morning when I was living on Seagrove Avenue, out by Cape May Point. It was a very strange sound.  I got out of bed and looked through the window to find what my sleepy eyes perceived as aliens. Two of them stood in my yard,… Read more »

Fishing Cape May

Yes, fishing fever is here. It’s more like a fishing frenzy in Cape May, a town with eleven commandments — thou shall fish rounding out the bunch. A place where being “seaworthy” is next to Godliness. An island uniquely placed where the Delaware Bay shakes hands with the Atlantic Ocean. PLUS – a recipe for Lemon Beurre Blanc

Cape May’s Seafood Industry: Dangerously Delicious

Cape May is the second busiest site for the off-loading of seafood ont he East Coast. Approximately 11-million pounds of seafood are off-loaded annually at Fisherman’s Wharf for distribution to points throughout the globe: 600,000 pounds of flounder, 120,000 pounds of lobster, 1.5 million pounds of sea scallops, and massive quantities of at least 18 other seafood varieties pass through the plant on its way to plates world-wide.